Reporting & Protection Orders

Kinds of Reporting

It is your decision whether or not you want to make a police report. You know what is best for you. The Care Center can be there every step of the way no matter what you decide to do. If you want to make a police report, there are two different options: criminal and informational.

criminal report opens an investigation and a forensic evidence collection exam can be part of this process. Law enforcement will want to interview you and you may have to repeat your story several times. This can be very difficult and re-traumatizing for anyone, but a Care Center Advocate can be there to support you during a law enforcement interview upon request.

An informational report is a written report made to law enforcement that does not open a criminal investigation. Not every incident is eligible for an informational report. For more information on informational reporting, please call our 24/7 Support Hotline at 785-843-8985.

It’s normal for survivors to worry about reporting to law enforcement.  Many people have questions and serious concerns about issues related to their assault, such as alcohol, drug use or immigration status.  If you would like someone to talk to about these concerns, Advocates are always available and provide nonjudgmental supportive counseling on our 24/7 Support Hotline at 785-843-8985.

Protection Orders

Protection orders, more commonly referred to as ‘restraining orders,’ are for individuals who want to prevent further harm from their abuser/perpetrator/attacker/stalker/etc. They are a civil order which is free to file, but requires at least one court appearance. It is possible to file a protection order on behalf of your minor child/children. It is important to note that it is up to the discretion of judges as to whether or not protection orders will be granted.

In Douglas, Franklin, and Jefferson Counties, there are two different types of protection orders which you may file:

Protection from Abuse (PFA): protection against an individual with whom you may have either lived with, have a child in common with, or are/have been in a dating relationship with.

Protection from Stalking (PFS): protection against an individual who does not meet the criteria of a PFA (e.g. a neighbor, co-worker, friend, etc.), but whom has been causing harm to you or your minor child/children.

Can I make a report at my school, college, or university?

Yes. Title IX is a federal law that prohibits sex-based discrimination in education and it offers protections for female, male, and gender non-conforming students, faculty, and staff who have experienced sexual violence. Each school, college, and university has its own reporting process and campus-specific services.

What is Title IX?

“9 Things to Know about Title IX” is a resource created by Know Your IX and more details can be found on their website. Need support in Douglas, Franklin, and Jefferson County? Contact The Care Center by calling 785-843-8985 or email support@stacarecenter.org.
1. Title IX is a landmark federal civil right that prohibits sex discrimination in education.
2. Title IX does not apply to female students only.
3. Your school must be proactive in ensuring that your campus is free of sex discrimination.
4. Your school must have an established procedure for handling complaints of sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual violence.
5. Your school must take immediate action to ensure a victim can continue their education free of ongoing sex discrimination, sexual harassment or sexual violence.
6. Your school may not retaliate against someone filing a complaint and must keep a victim safe from other retaliatory harassment or behavior.
7. Your school can issue a no contact directive under Title IX to prevent the accused student from approaching or interacting with you.
8. In cases of sexual violence, your college is prohibited from encouraging or allowing mediation (rather than a formal hearing) of the complaint.
9. Your college should not make you pay the costs of certain accommodations that you require in order to continue your education after experiencing violence.

Title IX in High School

“Title IX in High School: The Basics” is a resource created by Know Your IX and more details can be found on their website. Need support in Douglas, Franklin, and Jefferson County? Contact The Care Center by calling 785-843-8985 or email support@stacarecenter.org.
1. Title IX is a federal civil rights law that prohibits sex discrimination in any educational program receiving federal funding.
2. Title IX does not apply to female students only.
3. Your school must have a clear, well-publicized procedure for responding to complaints of sexual harassment and sexual violence.
4. Your school must be proactive in ensuring that your campus is safe for you.
5. Your school or school district must designate at least one employee as a “Title IX coordinator,” whose job is to make sure your school is following the law.
6. Regardless of the outcome of any investigation, your school may not retaliate against you for filing a complaint and must keep you safe from retaliatory harassment or behavior from your perpetrator or a third-party.
7. A school’s responsibility to address harassment and violence is not limited to conduct that occurs at school during school hours. Schools must also address harassment and violence that occur “off campus,” such as on the school bus, during field trips, and during extracurricular activities.
8. Your school should provide age-appropriate training to students on Title IX, sexual violence, consent, the school’s grievance procedure, reporting options, and bystander intervention.
9. Your school must provide you the accommodations and services you need to stay in school — free of charge.

Title IX in Colleges & Universities

Are The Care Center Advocates mandated reporters?

While our volunteer and staff advocates are not mandated reporters, our Counseling staff are mandated reporters. This is typical of licensed mental health professionals and is always discussed within the first meeting. It is important to note that while our volunteer and staff advocates are not mandated reporters, there are certain circumstances in which we may feel the need to make a report. This is always communicated before a report of any kind is made.